A Cup Full of Possibilitea

DT Appreciation Week - Day 05 - Tenth Doctor/DW
Have some happy Doctor.

Grace Kelly photographed by Howell Conant, 1956

Cakes have gotten a bad rap. People equate virtue with turning down dessert. There is always one person at the table who holds up her hand when I serve the cake. No, really, I couldn’t she says, and then gives her flat stomach a conspiratorial little pat. Everyone who is pressing a fork into that first tender layer looks at the person who declined the plate, and they all think, That person is better than I am. That person has discipline. But that isn’t a person with discipline; that is a person who has completely lost touch with joy. A slice of cake never made anybody fat. You don’t eat the whole cake. You don’t eat a cake every day of your life. You take the cake when it is offered because the cake is delicious. You have a slice of cake and what it reminds you of is someplace that’s safe, uncomplicated, without stress. A cake is a party, a birthday, a wedding. A cake is what’s served on the happiest days of your life. This is a story of how my life was saved by cake, so, of course, if sides are to be taken, I will always take the side of cake.

Jeanne Ray  (via elauxe)

I met Jeanne Ray at a literary event once. She’s a sweet woman - as you might expect of an author who was a nurse throughout most of her professional career. (She’s also Ann Patchett’s mom.) 

(via bookoisseur)

We have lost phone conversations, because talking on cell phones is no fun at all, and it’s harder than texting or typing. I do think we’ve lost that, but we’ve gained a lot with the internet. I feel like the internet has turned us all into letter writers. I think of my mother when I was a kid, she never wrote down anything but a grocery list. People didn’t write, because you’d call. Why would you write anything? But now we’re all writers.

So when people complain about grammar and punctuation, I think it isn’t that our grammar and punctuation have gotten worse, but that it used to be that only writers wrote. Only people who were in education wrote, but now we all write: we all text, we all post. I feel like we’ve lost phones but we’ve gained this whole different type of correspondence that hasn’t existed since the age of letter writing.

Rainbow Rowell interview on Den of Geek: Landline, fangirls, the internet (via bethanyactually)

Also, super-importantly so I’m going to bold and all-caps it: IN THE OLD DAYS PEOPLE’S LETTERS WERE FUCKING FULL OF SPELLING AND GRAMMAR MISTAKES AND ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS AND IDOSYNCRASIES.

If you take a look at ACTUAL LETTERS especially of any but the higher (and thus more formally educated and more socially required to PERFORM that education) ranks, they read like people’s emails with more random capitals and weird spellings that make no sense because you don’t share their accent.

Nobody knows this solely because how do we ever read these letters, if we do? IN TWO PLACES: EDITED EXCERPTS IN HISTORY TEXTS, WITH CORRECTED SPELLING AND GRAMMAR, or IN NOVELS WHERE THEY WERE WRITTEN IN FAIR HAND IN THE FIRST PLACE.

The only way we encounter the letters of the past deliberately erases their unique handprint.

(via last-snowfall)

captainofthenx02:

hauntedbynumberlessislands:

Adam Hills rant about the Westboro Baptist Church picketting Robin Williams funeral.

Perfect.

no but seriously everyone should watch this. I stood up in my living room and fucking applauded.

gbbo-blog:

antonyandthex-men:

#MaryBerryDeathStare #GBBO #JustSayNoToShopBought

shop bought fondant? you’re going home

gbbo-blog:

antonyandthex-men:

#MaryBerryDeathStare #GBBO #JustSayNoToShopBought

shop bought fondant? you’re going home

thatwetshirt:

The Philadelphia Story (1940) dir. George Cukor